Leatrice Cicale
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Leatrice Cicale

Author:Leatrice Cicale
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What Are The Principal Reasons For Over-Pronation Of The Foot
Overview


Overpronation is a term that gets thrown around a lot by psuedo-experts and there is so much written online about it, that it can get very confusing to determine what is legitimate and what is not. Pronation is a normal motion of the foot that occurs when the ankle rolls inwards and the arch collapses. This is normal. Its not something evil. Overpronation is assumed to be when there is too much of it. There certainly is debate as to just how much is too much, as some people have large amounts and have no problems, other have small amounts and do have problems. It all comes down to individual differences and how much force is needed to stop the foot moving. The greater the force, regardless of the amounts of pronation, the more likely it is to be a problem. Some still like to debate if it is a problem or not. Some studies have shown that its not a problem and other studies have shown it is. If the data from all these studies are pooled, then the conclusion was that, yes, overpronation is a problem that was statistically significant, but it was only a small risk factor for problems. An associated finding of overpronation during a gait analysis is an abductory twist.Over Pronation


Causes


In adults, the most common reason for the onset of Over-Pronation is a condition known as Post Tibial Tendonitis. This condition develops from repetitive stress on the main supporting tendon (Posterior Tibial Tendon) of the foot arch. As the body ages, ligaments and muscles can weaken. When this occurs the job of providing the majority of the support required by the foot arch is placed upon this tendon. Unfortunately, this tendon cannot bear the weight of this burden for too long. Eventually it fatigues under the added strain and in doing so the foot arch becomes progressively lower over a period of time.


Symptoms


When standing, your heels lean inward. When standing, one or both of your knee caps turn inward. Conditions such as a flat feet or bunions may occur. You develop knee pain when you are active or involved in athletics. The knee pain slowly goes away when you rest. You abnormally wear out the soles and heels of your shoes very quickly.


Diagnosis


People who overpronate have flat feet or collapsed arches. You can tell whether you overpronate by wetting your feet and standing on a dry, flat surface. If your footprint looks complete, you probably overpronate. Another way to determine whether you have this condition is to simply look at your feet when you stand. If there is no arch on the innermost part of your sole, and it touches the floor, you likely overpronate. The only way to truly know for sure, however, is to be properly diagnosed by a foot and ankle specialist.Foot Pronation


Non Surgical Treatment


Orthotics are medical devices used to provide support to correct a physical abnormality. They can provide arch support when needed to remedy over-pronation, and in this particular cases the orthoses used are usually convenient shoe inserts. These can be taken in and out of shoes, and will be carefully tailored by your podiatrist to the specifics of your foot. It can take some weeks before the effects of the inserts can become truly noticeable, and in many cases your podiatrist will want to review your orthotics within a few weeks to make fine adjustments based on how well they have worked to reduce your pain.


Surgical Treatment


Subtalar Arthroereisis. The ankle and hindfoot bones/midfoot bones around the joint are fused, locking the bones in place and preventing all joint motion. This may also be done in combination with fusion at other joints. This is a very aggressive option usually reserved for extreme cases where no joint flexibility is present and/or the patient has severe arthritic changes in the joint.

What Exactly Is Severs Disease?
Overview


Sever?s disease a term used to describe pain in the heel at the base of the Achilles tendon. It usually occurs during or after a growth spurt in adolescence most commonly between the ages of 8-13 in girls and 10-15 for boys. Sever?s disease is more prevalent in children who are physically active. Those with Sever?s disease commonly experience pain during or after sports that involve running and jumping, especially those that take place on hard surfaces.


Causes


The condition generally occurs in active children at early adolescence during rapid growth periods as the heel bone can grow faster than the leg muscles causing them to become tight and overstretched. Sever?s disease most often caused by inadequate footwear, playing sport on hard surfaces, calf tightness and biomechanical problems.


Symptoms


The typical patient is a child between 10 and 13 years of age, complaining of pain in one or both heels with running and walking. The pain is localized to the point of the heel where the tendo-Achilles inserts into the calcaneus, and is tender to deep pressure at that site. Walking on his toes relieves the pain.


Diagnosis


Low-grade inflammation of the calcaneal apophysis cannot be seen on x-ray. Therefore, although x-rays are often done to rule out bony injuries in children with Sever's disease these x-rays are usually normal. Advanced Sever's disease can be seen on x-ray but usually the problem is treated before it reaches this point. Other diagnostic tests, such as bone scans or MRI's, are not usually required in typical cases of Sever's disease. These, or other tests, may be required to rule out other conditions, such as stress fractures of the calcaneus or other bony abnormalities that can mimic Severs disease.


Non Surgical Treatment


Your child may need to change or stop doing the activities that cause pain until the growth plate heals. Your child needs to wear shoes with good padding in the heels and good arch support. Special shoes or shoe inserts may help. Pain from Sever's disease may last weeks to months. The pain may come back if your child returns to sports or strenuous activities too soon.


Surgical Treatment


The surgeon may select one or more of the following options to treat calcaneal apophysitis. Reduce activity. The child needs to reduce or stop any activity that causes pain. Support the heel. Temporary shoe inserts or custom orthotic devices may provide support for the heel. Medications. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, help reduce the pain and inflammation. Physical therapy. Stretching or physical therapy modalities are sometimes used to promote healing of the inflamed issue. Immobilization. In some severe cases of pediatric heel pain, a cast may be used to promote healing while keeping the foot and ankle totally immobile. Often heel pain in children returns after it has been treated because the heel bone is still growing. Recurrence of heel pain may be a sign of calcaneal apophysitis, or it may indicate a different problem. If your child has a repeat bout of heel pain, be sure to make an appointment with your foot and ankle surgeon.